WHY DO SO MANY ADULT KIDS STILL LIVE AT HOME?

WHY DO SO MANY ADULT KIDS STILL LIVE AT HOME?

A look at Senator Ben Sasse’s book, The Vanishing American Adult

Nebraska Senator, Ben Sasse, has written a very important book, The Vanishing American Adult. His argument is simple: numerous forces have altered our cultural landscape so that we no longer educate our young. The phase of adolescence that had, in the past, been a transitional phase, is now a permanent destination from which most do not escape. Many high school grads have not worked a job at all. The increasing norm is for college grads to go back home and live with their parents. Marriage and family is put off until one’s thirties, if ever.

What happened? The problem is that life happens so quickly. As parents, we are so busy that we often get swept up in the acceptable norms of the day, with little time to reflect on whether or not we are being wise. Numerous trends such as public schools, medicated kids, extra-curricular activities, travel sports, video games, and teens with smart phones all seem, well, so normal. But are they? More importantly, are these things wise, helpful, and producing well-balanced adults? Senator Ben Sasse offers an emphatic No!

Sasse, who holds a PhD in American History from Yale, argues that much of what we are doing with our kids in western culture is downright destructive. He says we are out of step with history and the wisdom of the past. He presents his material in a level-headed, non-preachy way. This is a good book. A very good book! A desperately needed book in American, middle class culture.

Sasse focuses on five important things to help raise balanced kids: 1) Get them involved with people of all ages. 2) Help them embrace work pain. 3) Guide them to consume less and give more. 4) Travel with them and really learn about life. 5) Help them become passionate readers and critical thinkers.

Do yourself a massive favor and read this book! The Vanishing American Adult offers a grand opportunity to stop, slow down, and think.

by Jay Childs, Senior Pastor